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Join us for the 2019 ESIP Summer Meeting!
Data to Action: Increasing the Use and Value of Earth Science Data and Information.  
For 20 years, ESIP meetings have brought together the most innovative thinkers and leaders around Earth observation data, thus forming a community dedicated to making Earth observations more discoverable, accessible and useful to researchers, practitioners, policymakers, and the public.
Register at http://www.cvent.com/d/66qpqs.

Sponsorship Opportunities: We are looking for a few more sponsors to enable us to take this meeting to the next level! If your organization understands the power of bringing people together to move Earth science data interoperability forward, we hope you will consider providing sponsorship. ESIP is all about collaboration and if sponsoring a break is not up your alley, but you would like the visibility that sponsorship provides, please reach out and let us know what might be a win for both ESIP and you. See more at https://www.esipfed.org/meetings/meeting-sponsorship.


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Monday, July 15
 

8:00am

DataONE Community Meeting
The DataONE Community Meeting will be a 1-day event featuring plenary presentations, topical breakout sessions, and community-led discussions in addition to an early evening poster reception.

To participate, you must register at https://www.dataone.org/dataone-users-group/2019-meeting.

Monday July 15, 2019 8:00am - 7:30pm
Room 407

8:30am

LTER IM Meeting (CLOSED)
Monday July 15, 2019 8:30am - 5:30pm
Room 318

8:30am

GeoSemantics Symposium
Limited Capacity seats available

The ESIP Semantic Technologies Committee is hosting its annual Geosemantics Symposium on Monday, July 15th, 2019, 8:30am to 5pm in Tacoma, WA co-located with the ESIP Summer 2019 Meeting. This year's symposium theme is Building Harmony between Data Semantics and Machine Learning which will act as, amongst other things, a platform for Semantic Technologies and Machine Learning enthusiasts to come together in an interdisciplinary manner.

The symposium will aim to investigate and integrate data semantics as a first class citizen within the pervasive machine learning technology space. We seek broad community input and encourage non-ESIP members and members of other professional societies to attend. Also, suggestions for topics to be covered are welcome.

To register, simply add this session to your schedule.

Workshops:
  • Session I: Amazon Web Services Nepture
  • Session II: Amazon Web Services SageMaker
  • Session III: ESRI Machine Learning
  • Session IV: Drone Data API Design Workshop

Note: The event itself is free; however, attendees will be responsible for providing their own travel and lodging.

This event is being held in conjunction with the ESIP Summer Meeting - we hope you join in the full week's activities. 



Monday July 15, 2019 8:30am - 6:15pm
Room 316

1:00pm

ESIP Board Meeting (CLOSED)
ESIP Board will meet for their quarterly meeting. This meeting is closed. 

Monday July 15, 2019 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 315

1:00pm

Registration Desk Open
Stop by ahead of the official meeting start on Tuesday morning and pick up your badge! 

Monday July 15, 2019 1:00pm - 5:00pm
TCC

2:00pm

 
Tuesday, July 16
 

7:30am

ESIP 101 & New to ESIP Intro
Are you new to ESIP? Join us for a quick primer on ESIP and meet ESIP leadership. 

Tuesday July 16, 2019 7:30am - 8:00am
316

8:00am

Morning Plenary
Welcoming Remarks
Erin Robinson, ESIP Executive Director and Karl Benedict, ESIP President

2019 Raskin Winner
Kai Blumberg

Legacy arsenic contamination in freshwater ecosystems: the unique vulnerability of shallow weakly stratified lakes
Dr. Becca Neumann, 2018 Falkenberg Winner

From Data Lakes to Rivers: Improving the Value and Reach of a Seismic Data Archive
Rob Casey, IRIS

Speakers
avatar for Kai Blumberg

Kai Blumberg

PhD Student, University of Arizona
Kai Blumberg is a PhD student in the University of Arizona Biosystems Engineering department. He is working to create a model cyberinfrastructure system called Planet Microbe to integrate and provide analytical tools to analyze key marine 'omics and biogeochemical datasets. As a contributor... Read More →
avatar for Erin Robinson

Erin Robinson

Executive Director, ESIP
avatar for Rob Casey

Rob Casey

Deputy Director of Cyberinfrastructure, IRIS DMC
Rob currently serves as Deputy Director of Cyberinfrastructure at the IncorporatedResearch Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) Data Management Center (DMC) in Seattle, WA. His responsibilities include management of software development and data services activities as well as leading... Read More →
KB

Karl Benedict

ESIP President, ESIP
The ESIP President is a volunteer position, elected by the ESIP Community each year. The President works with the ESIP Staff for several of the presentation, speaker introductions, award ceremonies, and other speaking/participating aspects of ESIP meetings throughout the year.
avatar for Becca Neumann

Becca Neumann

Associate Professor, University of Washington
Dr. Neumann leads the hydro-biogeochemistry research group at the University of Washington, which works to understand how hydrologic, chemical and biological processes interact in soils, aquifers and surface waters to control chemical fate and transport. The group tackles societally... Read More →


Tuesday July 16, 2019 8:00am - 9:45am
TCC

9:45am

Break
Tuesday July 16, 2019 9:45am - 10:15am
TCC

10:15am

Cloud Security and Compliance in Public Sector Archives
Increasing user adoption of and applications for cloud technologies as well as exponential growth in data volumes demands our public sector data archives accommodate cloud computing. Simultaneously, government-funded computing environments have constraints that present unique challenges in providing archives in the cloud, including Trusted Internet Connection mandates, funding models and legislation which do not allow unbounded costs, and security policies inherited from a pre-cloud world. Join us to discuss the progress members of the ESIP community have made in overcoming these hurdles toward moving large public sector archives to the cloud for valuable science applications.

Moderators
PQ

Patrick Quinn

Software Engineer, NASA / EED-2 Element 84

Speakers

Tuesday July 16, 2019 10:15am - 11:45am
Ballrm A

10:15am

Big Gridded Data: The transition from legacy to next generation
This session aims to explore several dimensions of technology and operational systems that support archiving, cataloging, distributing, subsetting, and processing of large structured data. For this session, large structured data is defined as any data with well structured spatial, temporal, band, scenario, ensemble, dimensions and associated variables that exceed practical size constraints of commodity internet and personal computing resources. Typical examples are very high-resolution geospatial grids, outputs from ocean, landscape, weather and climate models, and multi-spectral remote sensing archives. Use cases for such data range from meta and reanalyses that require run-time access to entire datasets at once to ad-hoc investigations requiring small subsets of one or more dimension. For example, a local science project may need a small spatial subset of an ensemble climate projection or a remote sensing research project may need to sample 100 point locations from a all scenes of a multispectral remote sensing product. Data formats and computing Infrastructure to support this range of use cases, from terabyte and greater data access to custom small-subset extraction presents a great challenge especially as technology changes and what was a sound implementation and investment becomes dated and unable to meet modern expectations.

This session will feature speakers who manage operations and maintenance of archives of large structured data, build software and standards designed to meet the needs of a wide range of large structured data use cases, and researchers working to evaluate and demonstrate the potential of next generation technical solutions.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Rich Signell

Rich Signell

Oceanographer, USGS
Ocean Modeling, Python, NetCDF, THREDDS, ERDDAP, UGRID, SGRID, CF-Conventions, Jupyter, JupyterHub, CSW, TerriaJS


Tuesday July 16, 2019 10:15am - 11:45am
Ballrm BC

10:15am

Cloud 101: How Do I Get Started In Cloud Computing Workshop
This workshop is structured to provide physical scientists with an authentic experience in making use of current cloud computing resources and related tools and machine learning services available. The cloud, a dynamic network of computers and virtual machines can offer platform or infrastructure-as-a-service (PaaS or IaaS respectively), or host software-as-a-service (SaaS), among other features. Physical scientists working with large data sets, extended time lines, and/or models and tools they would like to share across diverse teams and user communities can achieve their objectives with these new technical capabilities. Additionally the cloud has security functions, making it a safe environment even for demanding scientific architectures.
The cloud also provides on-demand, ‘elastic’ access to shared computing resources providing flexibility for projects and scientists who require bursts of computing power rather than sustained usage. Some of the companies that offer cloud services include Amazon, Google and Microsoft.
This workshop includes representatives from Amazon and experienced cloud users working with participants to convey data and tools to the cloud based on actual use cases. Participants should bring their own computers and plan on working through a use case, creating their own AWS cloud account and project, and completing some data analysis on the cloud.

Moderators
Speakers

Tuesday July 16, 2019 10:15am - 11:45am
Ballrm D

10:15am

Drone Data API Design Hackathon
Drones are a valuable new platform for collecting data. We have the technology to make these data ubiquitously FAIR. We should build that data infrastructure, come help design it.

The Sloan Foundation funded Drone Data API project aims to build a standards based foundations tool stack to provide a linked-data- , open source- and networked- native foundation for domains to leverage in building the specific tools they require for efficient data capture with drones. These APIs will therefore leverage OGC, W3C, and Engineering standards; along with GIS, Library, and Scientific Domain best practices.

Participants are encouraged to join the GeoSemantics Symposium on Monday and then spend Tuesday on a design hackathon to workshop the provisional high level API design towards a concrete
design plan.

Interested? You must register for the ESIP Summer Meeting at http://www.cvent.com/d/66qpqs. You should also register your intent to join at http://tinyurl.com/yxsg6xal. Limited travel support is available. You can apply for the travel support using the same form by 17 May 2019. This event is open to all career levels. Drone experience is not required. The organizers are seeking breadth of relevant expertise and are seeking to build a skilled community.

Questions? Contact jwyngaar@nd.edu.

Speakers
avatar for Jane Wyngaard

Jane Wyngaard

University of Notre Dame


Tuesday July 16, 2019 10:15am - 11:45am
Room 315

10:15am

FAIR Metadata
The FAIR principles provide high-level guidance for making data findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable. Some of these principles describe repository characteristics and practices while others describe data and metadata characteristics. The metadata characteristics are described in very broad terms like “rich metadata”, “a plurality of accurate and relevant attributes”, and “detailed provenance”. Data providers in the ESIP community use many metadata dialects to serves many disciplines. Implementing the FAIR Principles in this community requires understanding specific metadata practices and elements that support these broad disciplines. The session will initiate a discussion of how this might be done with examples from several commonly used metadata dialects.

Moderators
avatar for Ted Habermann

Ted Habermann

Owner, Metadata Game Changers
I am interested in all facets of metadata needed to discover, access, use, and understand data of any kind. Also evaluation and improvement of metadata collections, translation proofing. Ask me about the Metadata Game.

Tuesday July 16, 2019 10:15am - 11:45am
Room 316

10:15am

Distributed Data Stewardship and You I
This is part 1 of a 2 part working session. How can we make it possible to coordinate management, replication, and governance of data on decentralized infrastructure? What efficiencies can we gain? What practices and lessons from centralized data governance should we take care to protect or learn from? ...and what does 'decentralized infrastructure' even mean!? Let's talk, together. **This is a working session -- there will be post-its for you to play with!** It will be light on slides, heavy on small group conversation. The outputs of our time together will be digitized and share back to the ESIP community. This is a continuation of the great conversation we started at the 2019 Winter Meeting, and will include a report-out from that meeting and other (non-ESIP) conversations that have happened since January.

Moderators
avatar for Michelle Hertzfeld

Michelle Hertzfeld

Product Management and User Experience, Protocol Labs

Speakers

Tuesday July 16, 2019 10:15am - 11:45am
Room 317

10:15am

Conveying Information Quality – Recent Progress
The Information Quality Cluster (IQC) has been active since 2014 improving understanding of various aspects of information quality and fostering collaborations nationally and internationally. During this period, NASA’s Earth Science Data System Working Groups included a Data Quality Working Group, which made several recommendations that have been documented, reviewed thoroughly and published. The IQC has had plenary and breakout sessions discussing ideas about uncertainty in Earth science datasets, which have evolved into a white paper. Significant progress has been made in defining and propagating maturity matrices for various aspects of data management including information quality. The purpose of this session is to summarize the status and accomplishments in each of these areas and discuss future directions that the IQC should take.

Agenda
1. Information Quality Cluster Introduction - H. K. Ramapriyan (Rama) - 10 mins
2. NASA Data Quality Working Group’s Recommendations and Publications – Yaxing Wei – 20 mins.
3. Uncertainty White Paper Status – David Moroni – 15 mins.
4. OGC and Data Quality (tentative title) – Ivana Ivanova - 15 mins.
5. Maturity Matrices Update – Ge Peng – 15 mins.
6. Discussion – All – 15 mins.

Speakers
avatar for Hampapuram Ramapriyan

Hampapuram Ramapriyan

Research Scientist/SME, Science Systems and Applications, Inc.
Information Quality, Data Stewardship, Provenance, Preservation Standards
avatar for Ge Peng

Ge Peng

Research Scholar, CICS-NC/NCEI
Dataset-centric scientific data stewardship, data quality management


Tuesday July 16, 2019 10:15am - 11:45am
Room 318

11:45am

Lunch
Tuesday July 16, 2019 11:45am - 12:45pm
TCC

12:45pm

Toward Better Earth Science UX
The “order and download” paradigm is dying. NASA and other organizations are moving their data holdings to the cloud and future missions will be producing so much data–petabytes per year in some cases–that the old way of viewing, subsetting, and analyzing this information needs to adapt. As this data grows in size and complexity, it demands more usable, accessible, and thoughtful designs and user interfaces that support science and help researchers answer important questions. This session will focus on how we’re developing better user interfaces that utilize remote sensing data–especially in a cloud environment, and the impact user experience plays on the search, discovery, and analysis of Earth science data.

Moderators
avatar for Jeff Siarto

Jeff Siarto

Creative Director, Element 84

Tuesday July 16, 2019 12:45pm - 2:15pm
Ballrm BC

12:45pm

Using Pangeo JupyterHubs to work with large public datasets
Bring your laptop to this hands-on workshop! Participants will learn about open-source scientific python ecosystem for analytic workflows with big data in Earth Science. Pangeo is first and foremost a community promoting open, reproducible, and scalable science (read more at https://pangeo.io). This community provides documentation, develops and maintains software, and deploys computing infrastructure to make scientific research and programming easier. The Pangeo software ecosystem involves open source tools such as xarray, iris, dask, jupyter, and many other packages. In brief workshop, participants will familiarize themselves with writing code in Jupyter Notebooks that can be run on scalable computing clusters running on the Cloud, bypassing a common bottleneck of downloading ever-increasing volumes of remote sensing or modeling data. We will introduce key Python tools and have participants write simple code to work with large public datasets hosted on Amazon Web Services and Google Cloud.

Moderators
Speakers

Tuesday July 16, 2019 12:45pm - 2:15pm
Ballrm D

12:45pm

Drone Data API Design Hackathon
Drones are a valuable new platform for collecting data. We have the technology to make these data ubiquitously FAIR. We should build that data infrastructure, come help design it.

The Sloan Foundation funded Drone Data API project aims to build a standards based foundations tool stack to provide a linked-data- , open source- and networked- native foundation for domains to leverage in building the specific tools they require for efficient data capture with drones. These APIs will therefore leverage OGC, W3C, and Engineering standards; along with GIS, Library, and Scientific Domain best practices.

Participants are encouraged to join the GeoSemantics Symposium on Monday and then spend Tuesday on a design hackathon to workshop the provisional high level API design towards a concrete
design plan.

Interested? You must register for the ESIP Summer Meeting at http://www.cvent.com/d/66qpqs. You should also register your intent to join at http://tinyurl.com/yxsg6xal. Limited travel support is available. You can apply for the travel support using the same form by 17 May 2019. This event is open to all career levels. Drone experience is not required. The organizers are seeking breadth of relevant expertise and are seeking to build a skilled community.

Questions? Contact jwyngaar@nd.edu.

Speakers
avatar for Jane Wyngaard

Jane Wyngaard

University of Notre Dame


Tuesday July 16, 2019 12:45pm - 2:15pm
Room 315

12:45pm

Metadata Evaluation - Tools and Results
ESIP community members are actively working throughout the data life cycle from data management planning to collection and creation to archiving, discovery, and data reuse. They use many metadata dialects to address multiple data use cases and are exposed to metadata requirements and recommendations from many organizations, disciplines, and communities. Using these recommendations to guide metadata improvement requires being able to evaluate existing metadata collections with respect to these recommendations. We will present metadata evaluation tools being developed and used by ESIP members with the goal of understanding and improving their utility across ESIP.

Moderators
avatar for Ted Habermann

Ted Habermann

Owner, Metadata Game Changers
I am interested in all facets of metadata needed to discover, access, use, and understand data of any kind. Also evaluation and improvement of metadata collections, translation proofing. Ask me about the Metadata Game.

Tuesday July 16, 2019 12:45pm - 2:15pm
Room 316

12:45pm

Distributed Data Stewardship and You II
This is part 2 of a 2 part working session. How can we make it possible to coordinate management, replication, and governance of data on decentralized infrastructure? What efficiencies can we gain? What practices and lessons from centralized data governance should we take care to protect or learn from? ...and what does 'decentralized infrastructure' even mean!? Let's talk, together. **This is a working session -- there will be post-its for you to play with!** It will be light on slides, heavy on small group conversation. The outputs of our time together will be digitized and share back to the ESIP community. This is a continuation of the great conversation we started at the 2019 Winter Meeting, and will include a report-out from that meeting and other (non-ESIP) conversations that have happened since January.

Moderators
avatar for Michelle Hertzfeld

Michelle Hertzfeld

Product Management and User Experience, Protocol Labs

Speakers

Tuesday July 16, 2019 12:45pm - 2:15pm
Room 317

12:45pm

Data Product Developers' Guide Workshop
The Data Product Developer's’ Guide Working Group within NASA’s Earth Science Data Systems Working Groups has been developing a guide to assist science data product developers in designing and producing products that are interoperable and conveniently usable by the community. A draft version of this document is expected to be available for broad review in early July 2019. While the initial target audience for this document are the NASA teams responsible for product generation, it is expected to be more broadly applicable. The purpose of this workshop session is to present briefly the contents of this document to interested ESIP members and promote a broader participation in the review process and facilitate improvements for the benefit of end user communities. During this session, the attendees will be divided into subgroups to review individual sections of the document and provide comments

Moderators
avatar for Hampapuram Ramapriyan

Hampapuram Ramapriyan

Research Scientist/SME, Science Systems and Applications, Inc.
Information Quality, Data Stewardship, Provenance, Preservation Standards

Speakers
avatar for Chris Lynnes

Chris Lynnes

Systems Engineer, NASA


Tuesday July 16, 2019 12:45pm - 2:15pm
Room 318

2:15pm

Break
Tuesday July 16, 2019 2:15pm - 2:45pm
TCC

2:45pm

2:45pm

Epic Fails in Earth Science Informatics: learning from the past to do better in the future
In research we tend to only present on and/or publish our successes as they are so integral to our career progression. Yet not everything we attempt is successful: no matter how hard we try, some of our research and developments fails. For cyberinfrastructure projects, there is a high risk of failure, as technology is changing so rapidly and unpredictably, whilst the change of research culture is slow. Edwards et al. (2007) emphasized the value of honestly reporting failures “to supporting long-term and comparative learning across the varieties of cyberinfrastructural experience” and recommended that “through the disciplined and even-handed study of failure, funders and proponents of cyberinfrastructure must learn to stop hiding the bodies”. New trends in biochemical research and publishing show increased attention to sharing of negative results from early clinical trials (Kevin Kelly, “Speculations on the Future of Science”).

The purpose of this session is to provide a free and blameless environment to encourage honest reporting of where things went wrong. It is time to bring the skeletons out of the closet and showcase Epic Fails that you know about (particularly your own) in software, data infrastructures, samples, software delivery, services, etc. From these, we can build a portfolio of lessons learned that will inform the future, and ultimately contribute to accelerating progress in Earth science informatics. (Note: for those who may find presenting in this session stressful, we will ensure a supporting environment where you can reveal your fails without having to show your face).

Moderators
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
Kerstin Lehnert is Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of the NSF-funded data facility IEDA (Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance). Kerstin holds a Ph.D in Petrology from the University of Freiburg in Germany... Read More →

Tuesday July 16, 2019 2:45pm - 4:15pm
Ballrm BC

2:45pm

Hands on with Jetstream Atmosphere Part I
This tutorial will first give an overview of Jetstream and various aspects of the system. Then we will take attendees through the basics of using Jetstream via the Atmosphere web interface. This will include a guided walk-through of the interface itself, the features provided, the image catalog, launching and using virtual machines on Jetstream, using volume-based storage, and best practices.

We are targeting users of every experience level. Atmosphere is well-suited to both HPC novices and advanced users. This tutorial is generally aimed at those unfamiliar with cloud computing and generally doing computation on laptops or departmental server resources. While we will not cover advanced topics in this particular tutorial, we will touch on the available advanced capabilities during the initial overview.

Moderators
Speakers

Tuesday July 16, 2019 2:45pm - 4:15pm
Ballrm D

2:45pm

Drone Data API Design Hackathon
Drones are a valuable new platform for collecting data. We have the technology to make these data ubiquitously FAIR. We should build that data infrastructure, come help design it.

The Sloan Foundation funded Drone Data API project aims to build a standards based foundations tool stack to provide a linked-data- , open source- and networked- native foundation for domains to leverage in building the specific tools they require for efficient data capture with drones. These APIs will therefore leverage OGC, W3C, and Engineering standards; along with GIS, Library, and Scientific Domain best practices.

Participants are encouraged to join the GeoSemantics Symposium on Monday and then spend Tuesday on a design hackathon to workshop the provisional high level API design towards a concrete
design plan.

Interested? You must register for the ESIP Summer Meeting at http://www.cvent.com/d/66qpqs. You should also register your intent to join at http://tinyurl.com/yxsg6xal. Limited travel support is available. You can apply for the travel support using the same form by 17 May 2019. This event is open to all career levels. Drone experience is not required. The organizers are seeking breadth of relevant expertise and are seeking to build a skilled community.

Questions? Contact jwyngaar@nd.edu.

Speakers
avatar for Jane Wyngaard

Jane Wyngaard

University of Notre Dame



Tuesday July 16, 2019 2:45pm - 4:15pm
Room 315

2:45pm

Metadata Improvement Lab 4: How FAIR is your metadata?
In the fourth MILE (Metadata Improvement Lab at ESIP) workshop, participants will utilize a Jupyter notebook hosted on ESIPhub to ingest metadata and evaluate the FAIRness of the records. The DataONE operationalization of the FAIR principles will be applied using XSL, Bash, and Python to visualize the completeness of a single record or an entire catalog.

Moderators
avatar for Sean Gordon

Sean Gordon

Information Engineer, The HDF Group
Talk to me about the ESIP Labs project, ESIPhub a JupyterHub based shared computational environment for workshops at Meetings.My research focuses on the connections between documentation structures and the evaluation of content for the metadata needs of diverse communities of practice... Read More →

Tuesday July 16, 2019 2:45pm - 4:15pm
Room 316

2:45pm

A Metadata Database Built on Usage Patterns in the LTER Network
LTER-core-metabase is a relational database model based on the GCE LTER Metabase, with adaptations by MCR, SBC, and BLE LTER sites.  The project provides a database schema for metadata about ecological data packages. The design is influenced heavily by the Ecological Metadata Language (EML).  There is also an associated R package, MetaEgress, that produces EML for a data package, enabling the information manager to quickly generate metadata for package archiving. The schema and R package are available on GitHub, with the schema represented as a set of SQL scripts to facilitate diffs.  

The Environmental Data Initiative (EDI) is defining a constrained profile of EML to streamline scripts and software for the broader community, but which is not tied to any specific back end storage system.  EML was designed to be extensible, but we have observed EML creators converging on a set of elements. De facto then, a profile is emerging, and that profile for EML can define the specs of a common interface, which facilitates writing shared tools against different backend metadata storage systems.  For example, LTER-Core-Metabase (a back-end), maps to the EML profile through views that decouple the outward-facing appearance from the back-end implementation. This session will share the current state of LTER-core-metabase and discuss advancing the project and its ties to EDI's profile for EML to improve data management system sustainability.


Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Margaret O'Brien

Margaret O'Brien

Data Manager, University of California, Santa Barbara


Tuesday July 16, 2019 2:45pm - 4:15pm
Room 317

2:45pm

NetCDF and CF: The Basics
This workshop will teach some of the basics of CF metadata for netCDF data files with some hands-on work available in Jupyter Notebooks using Python. Along with introduction to netCDF and CF, we will introduce the CF data model and discuss some netCDF implementation details to consider when deciding how to write data with CF and netCDF. We will cover gridded data as well as in situ data (stations, soundings, etc.) and touch on storing geometries data in CF.

Speakers
avatar for Ethan Davis

Ethan Davis

UCAR Unidata


Tuesday July 16, 2019 2:45pm - 4:15pm
Room 318

4:15pm

Quick Break
Tuesday July 16, 2019 4:15pm - 4:30pm
TCC

4:30pm

4:30pm

ESIP's International Connections: Sharing work that spans U.S., Australia and Europe
This session will highlight collaborative work between ESIP community in the U.S. and counterparts in Australia and Europe. It will introduce E2SIP (Earth & Environmental Information Partners), the emerging Australian community being incubated by ESIP and share how we have gone about establishing these connections. The session will also highlight three or four projects that are being led by international collaborators focused on drones, samples, data management training and more.

Moderators
avatar for Erin Robinson

Erin Robinson

Executive Director, ESIP

Speakers
avatar for Jane Wyngaard

Jane Wyngaard

University of Notre Dame
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
Kerstin Lehnert is Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of the NSF-funded data facility IEDA (Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance). Kerstin holds a Ph.D in Petrology from the University of Freiburg in Germany... Read More →


Tuesday July 16, 2019 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Ballrm BC

4:30pm

Hands on with Jetstream Atmosphere Part II
This tutorial will first give an overview of Jetstream and various aspects of the system. Then we will take attendees through the basics of using Jetstream via the Atmosphere web interface. This will include a guided walk-through of the interface itself, the features provided, the image catalog, launching and using virtual machines on Jetstream, using volume-based storage, and best practices.

We are targeting users of every experience level. Atmosphere is well-suited to both HPC novices and advanced users. This tutorial is generally aimed at those unfamiliar with cloud computing and generally doing computation on laptops or departmental server resources. While we will not cover advanced topics in this particular tutorial, we will touch on the available advanced capabilities during the initial overview.

Moderators
Speakers

Tuesday July 16, 2019 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Ballrm D

4:30pm

Drone Data API Design Hackathon
Drones are a valuable new platform for collecting data. We have the technology to make these data ubiquitously FAIR. We should build that data infrastructure, come help design it.

The Sloan Foundation funded Drone Data API project aims to build a standards based foundations tool stack to provide a linked-data- , open source- and networked- native foundation for domains to leverage in building the specific tools they require for efficient data capture with drones. These APIs will therefore leverage OGC, W3C, and Engineering standards; along with GIS, Library, and Scientific Domain best practices.

Participants are encouraged to join the GeoSemantics Symposium on Monday and then spend Tuesday on a design hackathon to workshop the provisional high level API design towards a concrete
design plan.

Interested? You must register for the ESIP Summer Meeting at http://www.cvent.com/d/66qpqs. You should also register your intent to join at http://tinyurl.com/yxsg6xal. Limited travel support is available. You can apply for the travel support using the same form by 17 May 2019. This event is open to all career levels. Drone experience is not required. The organizers are seeking breadth of relevant expertise and are seeking to build a skilled community.

Questions? Contact jwyngaar@nd.edu.

Speakers
avatar for Jane Wyngaard

Jane Wyngaard

University of Notre Dame


Tuesday July 16, 2019 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Room 315

4:30pm

Bridging The Gap Between Discovery and Use (Data and Tools)
How do metadata repositories with vast amounts of various data help users start working with the data quickly and easily? Connecting users to the data and tools/services that can utilize the data has been an ongoing challenge. To increase the value and use of Earth science data, having tools and services that can utilize data is crucial for doing scientific research. This session will convey how metadata repositories are attempting to help users start working with their data immediately through the use of metadata modeling and intuitive discovery tools. In this session, we will also capture best practices for connecting data to tools that can be shared with other organizations who are trying to tackle this issue.

Speakers
avatar for Tyler Stevens

Tyler Stevens

CMR Metadata Quality Team, NASA EED-2 / SGT
avatar for Anna Milan

Anna Milan

NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)
~*~Metadata Adds Meaning~*~


Tuesday July 16, 2019 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Room 316

4:30pm

What does it mean to be a Data Mentor?
Research data can become at risk for a variety of reasons, and the risks can occur throughout the data’s lifecycle. It takes dedicated resources to ensure data can be preserved for the long term and be made available, accessible, and usable to all. At DataAtRisk.org (https://dataatrisk.org), we rely on “Data Mentors,” or people who are committed to protecting data from risk, to make data secure and facilitate data rescue activities.

During this session, the DataAtRisk team invites attendees to help us formalize the “Data Mentor” role and its responsibilities for our Data Nomination Tool. We will first clarify the key characteristics (or personas) for the “Data Mentor”. Based on these personas, we will use user stories to describe the types of data rescue activities that the “Data Mentors” need to prioritize. Further, using these pieces of information, we will build a realistic workflow that represents the amount of effort it takes for the “Data Mentor” when facilitating data rescue activities submitted via the Data Nomination Tool. Finally, we will determine if “Data Mentor” is the appropriate name for this role.

Data Nomination Tool facilitates community-driven rescue efforts for Earth and Environmental science data. Particularly, the web-based tool connects people who can provide long term data stewardship support with those who need the assistance. The tool is created and hosted by CloudBIRST (https://cloudbirst.com/, key contact: Joan Saez). DataAtRisk.org’s current members also consist of individuals from Earth Science Information Partners (see ESIP Partners here: https://www.esipfed.org/partners), Johns Hopkins University Sheridan Libraries, and representatives from several University Research Libraries.

Moderators
avatar for Denise Hills

Denise Hills

Director, Energy Investigations, Geological Survey of Alabama
Long tail data, data preservation, connecting physical samples to digital information, geoscience policy, science communication

Tuesday July 16, 2019 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Room 317

4:30pm

netCDF-CF Workshop Part I
This is part 1 of a 4 part workshop. The Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata convention for netCDF (netCDF-CF) is a community-developed standard first released in 2003. The CF conventions were originally developed to represent climate and forecast model output encoded in the netCDF binary format, with the specific goal of facilitating comparison of output from different models. Subsequent development of the convention has broadened its scope to include observational data and derived products.

This workshop will focus on discussing current and future efforts and directions for the CF conventions.

Speakers
KO

Kevin O'Brien

NOAA and Univ. of Washington
avatar for Jessica Hausman

Jessica Hausman

Data Engineer, PO.DAAC JPL
AJ

Aleksandar Jelenak

The HDF Group
DH

David Hassell

University of Reading
avatar for Daniel Lee

Daniel Lee

Software and data foramt engineer, EUMETSAT
GC

Guilherme Castelao

Scripps Institution of Oceanography
avatar for Ethan Davis

Ethan Davis

UCAR Unidata


Tuesday July 16, 2019 4:30pm - 6:00pm
Room 318

6:00pm

End of Day 1
Tuesday July 16, 2019 6:00pm - 6:00pm
TCC
 
Wednesday, July 17
 

8:00am

Morning Plenary
  • Increasing the Impact of the Smithsonian's Geological Collections
    Adam Mansur, Smithsonian Institution

  • Ease Leads to Exposure, Exposure Leads to Adoption
    Dawn Wright, Esri

  • Have you heard this data? New approaches to science communication with data sonification and music
    Judy Twedt, University of Washington

  • Climate Change and Ocean Impacts: Washington’s use-case for earth science data
    Jennifer Hennessey, Washington State Government


Speakers
avatar for Jennifer Hennessey

Jennifer Hennessey

Senior Policy Advisor on Ocean Health, Washington State Government
Jennifer Hennessey is a senior policy advisor on ocean health for Washington State Governor Jay Inslee. Ms. Hennessey advises on policies to address ocean impacts from climate change, such as ocean acidification, ocean warming, hypoxia, and other ocean health topics. Previously, Ms... Read More →
avatar for Adam Mansur

Adam Mansur

Data Manager, Smithsonian Institution
Adam joined the Department of Mineral Sciences at the Smithsonian Institution in 2010 after completing an MS in geochemistry at the University of Maryland. At the Smithsonian, Adam oversees data about one of the largest, most comprehensive geological collections in the world. The... Read More →
avatar for Judy Twedt

Judy Twedt

Climate Data Sound Artist, University of Washington
Judy Twedt uses sound and music to create acoustic and emotionally expressive representations of climate data.  Analogous to visualization, data sonification is the sonic representation of data. Judy's climate data soundtracks have been aired on KUOW, PBS, and NPR.  She is a speaker... Read More →
avatar for Dawn Wright

Dawn Wright

Chief Scientist, Esri
As Chief Scientist of Esri, Dawn Wright aids in strengthening the scientific foundation for Esri software and services, while also representing Esri to the scientific community. A specialist in marine geology, Dawn has authored and contributed to some of the most definitive literature... Read More →


Wednesday July 17, 2019 8:00am - 10:00am
TCC

8:30am

netCDF-CF Workshop Part II
This is part 2 of a 4 part workshop. The Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata convention for netCDF (netCDF-CF) is a community-developed standard first released in 2003. The CF conventions were originally developed to represent climate and forecast model output encoded in the netCDF binary format, with the specific goal of facilitating comparison of output from different models. Subsequent development of the convention has broadened its scope to include observational data and derived products.

This workshop will focus on discussing current and future efforts and directions for the CF conventions.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Hausman

Jessica Hausman

Data Engineer, PO.DAAC JPL
AJ

Aleksandar Jelenak

The HDF Group
KO

Kevin O'Brien

NOAA and Univ. of Washington
DH

David Hassell

University of Reading
avatar for Daniel Lee

Daniel Lee

Software and data foramt engineer, EUMETSAT
GC

Guilherme Castelao

Scripps Institution of Oceanography
avatar for Ethan Davis

Ethan Davis

UCAR Unidata


Wednesday July 17, 2019 8:30am - 10:00am
Room 318

10:00am

Break
Wednesday July 17, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am
TCC

10:30am

Approaches to extending schema.org for Data APIs
PROBLEM: schema.org can describe static Datasets, but it's difficult to accurately describe services and APIs that provide access to data. This session will bring together data API managers and curators, conceptual modelers and ontologists to model and develop a schema.org extension address accessing data through APIs and services.

Moderators
avatar for Adam Shepherd

Adam Shepherd

Technical Director, Co-PI, BCO-DMO
schema.org | Data Containerization | Linked Data | Semantic Web | Knowledge Representation | Ontologies

Wednesday July 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Ballrm A

10:30am

Assessment Frameworks and Dimensions for Educational & Training Resources
One of the goals of the Institute of Museum & Library Services National Leadership Grant recipient and ESIP-hosted Data Management Training Clearinghouse (DMTC) is to identify and/or develop assessment frameworks that could be applied to the educational & training resource content in the DMTC. While a number of approaches to assessing educational resources seem promising (e.g., the Kirkpatrick framework, CLEAN evaluation criteria) the working group tasked to address the question of assessment would like to know more about these approaches, how they might apply to the DMTC resources or the DMTC itself, and the mechanisms or processes that have been developed by others to evaluate educational and training resources. The session will include invited speakers to describe different frameworks and how they are used, but also allow ample time to discuss how the frameworks might apply to DMTC resources.

Moderators
KB

Karl Benedict

ESIP President, ESIP
The ESIP President is a volunteer position, elected by the ESIP Community each year. The President works with the ESIP Staff for several of the presentation, speaker introductions, award ceremonies, and other speaking/participating aspects of ESIP meetings throughout the year.

Wednesday July 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Ballrm BC

10:30am

Getting your data into the cloud: How to deploy and use Cumulus
This session will be an interactive walkthrough of how to deploy the open-source Cumulus tool for getting your data into the cloud and a live demo of using Cumulus to ingest a new set of science data into the cloud

Moderators
Wednesday July 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Ballrm D

10:30am

EnviroSensing: Sensor Data, Technology, and Best Practices
Sponsored by the ESIP EnviroSensing Cluster, this session is open to scientists, information managers, and technologists interested in the general topic of in-situ environmental sensing for science and management. Our community of practitioners promotes conversation around, and development and refinement of techniques to observe natural Earth system processes over short and long timescales. Short talks on new data types, interesting technology applications, project case studies, data management, related software tools, quality control processes, and other advances in the field are welcome and invited to submit!


Wednesday July 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 316

10:30am

The Information Management Code Registry: Software Solutions for Information Management Needs
The Information Management Code Registry (IMCR) enhances the use and value of Earth Science data by facilitating discovery of software solutions for information management needs. Our primary goal with the IMCR is to create a comprehensive registry of information management software that is searchable by task (e.g. quality control) and other attributes (e.g. science domain). Our secondary goal is to highlight coverage gaps and help shift redundant effort to new development. In this session, we report on the accomplishment of the primary goal and present plans for attaining the second. Additionally, we will run group activities and discussions to: (1) Test and refine discoverability-, (2) inform identification of coverage gaps, (3) explore the benefit of adding non-generalized, but unique and useful, scripts developed for a single purpose, and (4) collectively cogitate on the general utility of the IMCR and how to maximize its value.


Wednesday July 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 317

10:30am

netCDF-CF Workshop Part III
This is part 3 of a 4 part workshop. The Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata convention for netCDF (netCDF-CF) is a community-developed standard first released in 2003. The CF conventions were originally developed to represent climate and forecast model output encoded in the netCDF binary format, with the specific goal of facilitating comparison of output from different models. Subsequent development of the convention has broadened its scope to include observational data and derived products.

This workshop will focus on discussing current and future efforts and directions for the CF conventions.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Hausman

Jessica Hausman

Data Engineer, PO.DAAC JPL
AJ

Aleksandar Jelenak

The HDF Group
KO

Kevin O'Brien

NOAA and Univ. of Washington
DH

David Hassell

University of Reading
avatar for Daniel Lee

Daniel Lee

Software and data foramt engineer, EUMETSAT
GC

Guilherme Castelao

Scripps Institution of Oceanography
avatar for Ethan Davis

Ethan Davis

UCAR Unidata


Wednesday July 17, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 318

12:00pm

Lunch
Wednesday July 17, 2019 12:00pm - 1:30pm
TCC

1:00pm

Data to Action Teacher Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

This workshop now begins at 1pm

Data in Action with Jupyter Notebooks and other Earth Science Tools

JOIN US for an afternoon deep-dive into two cutting-edge data science activities. First, we’ll use Jupyter Notebooks to investigate a 100-year hurricane dataset, modifying code to dig deeper. We’ll also examine GOES weather satellite tools, art history, geosciences, and biodiversity data-sets using the SuAVE visual exploration tool.
  • 1:00 pm - Introductions, ESIP Overview & Intro to Block Coding with Jupyter Notebooks
  • 1:15 pm - GOES-16/17 RGB Activity from NOAA CIMSS
  • 1:30 pm Jupyter Notebooks Hurricane Activity
  • 3:00 pm - Break
  • 3:30 pm - SuAVE Survey Analysis via Visual Exploration
  • 4:45 pm - Wrap-up and Evaluations
  • 5:30 pm (optional) - Research Showcase
Participating teachers are warmly invited and strongly encouraged to attend the Research Showcase Wednesday evening from 5:30 to 8pm. The Educator workshop is one portion of the larger ESIP 2019 Summer Meeting in Tacoma Washington and educators are welcome all week!
Teachers participating will receive a stipend of $200 (thanks to NOAA). More information and registration at https://2019esipsummermeeting.sched.com/info.


Speakers
avatar for Sean Gordon

Sean Gordon

Information Engineer, The HDF Group
Talk to me about the ESIP Labs project, ESIPhub a JupyterHub based shared computational environment for workshops at Meetings.My research focuses on the connections between documentation structures and the evaluation of content for the metadata needs of diverse communities of practice... Read More →
avatar for LuAnn Dahlman

LuAnn Dahlman

Science Writer and Editor, NOAA Climate Program Office
The updated Climate Explorer application.
avatar for Shelley Olds

Shelley Olds

Science Education Specialist, UNAVCO
Data visualization tools, Earth science education, human dimensions of natural hazards, disaster risk reduction (DRR), resilience building.



Wednesday July 17, 2019 1:00pm - 5:00pm
Room 315

1:30pm

Advancing spatial and temporal aspects of schema.org
PROBLEM: schema.org is currently inconsistent with standards organizations (W3C, OGC) representations of spatial and temporal information. This session will bring together data curators, conceptual modelers and ontologists to formulate solutions for extending schema.org's approach to spatial and temporal descriptions.

Moderators
avatar for Adam Shepherd

Adam Shepherd

Technical Director, Co-PI, BCO-DMO
schema.org | Data Containerization | Linked Data | Semantic Web | Knowledge Representation | Ontologies

Wednesday July 17, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Ballrm A

1:30pm

Getting Stuff Done with R, Python and Jupyter Notebooks
Sometimes the hardest part of getting started with coding is to determine which is the best software to learn or use! The goal of this session is to provide a basic introduction to three commonly-used tools for data management and analysis and to provide examples of how they can be used for managing data, visualization, exploiting cloud resources, generating metadata, using or creating web services, manipulating XML documents, and facilitating reorganization of data.

A panel will provide brief overviews of R, Python, and Jupyter Notebooks, including examples of what they do best, drawn from real-world applications. Workshop attendees will be encouraged to participate in discussions of data challenges they have encountered and the relative merits of the different tools in meeting them. Participation in the session by coders experienced in one or more of the tools is encouraged, as is participation by those who have yet to use any of these very powerful tools.


Wednesday July 17, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Ballrm BC

1:30pm

Cloud Engineering in Practice
With the immense increase in volume of data acquisition and archival comes the challenge of intensive data processing that we are all trying to solve. There are many efforts underway to achieve this by infusing cloud technologies into software infrastructure. In this session we would like to cover the various approaches being taken to move towards scalable storage and auto scaled processing. We will talk about porting applications to the cloud, container based deployment models and a hybrid science data processing system. This data system utilizes both on-premise and remote compute resources to meet latency requirements while handling the large volumes of data. Cloud based infrastructure is being used for running data analytic stacks, automated workflows for reprocessing campaigns, forward keep up and much more. Several projects have invested in cloud technologies such as GRFN (Getting Ready for NISAR), PO.DAAC, SWOT and so on. We have explored running our softwares on several cloud platforms like Azure, Google Cloud Platform, Amazon Web Services, High Performance Computing and Kubernetes. We would like to shed some light on such work and lessons learned in the process.


Wednesday July 17, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Ballrm D

1:30pm

Data to Action Teacher Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

The full workshop now begins at 1pm

1:30 pm  - 3pm session: Jupyter Notebooks Hurricane Activity

Data in Action with Jupyter Notebooks and other Earth Science Tools

JOIN US for an afternoon deep-dive into two cutting-edge data science activities. First, we’ll use Jupyter Notebooks to investigate a 100-year hurricane dataset, modifying code to dig deeper. We’ll also examine GOES weather satellite tools, art history, geosciences, and biodiversity data-sets using the SuAVE visual exploration tool.
  • 1:00 pm - Introductions, ESIP Overview & Intro to Block Coding with Jupyter Notebooks
  • 1:15 pm - GOES-16/17 RGB Activity from NOAA CIMSS
  • 1:30 pm Jupyter Notebooks Hurricane Activity
  • 3:00 pm - Break
  • 3:30 pm - SuAVE Survey Analysis via Visual Exploration
  • 4:45 pm - Wrap-up and Evaluations
  • 5:30 pm (optional) - Research Showcase
Participating teachers are warmly invited and strongly encouraged to attend the Research Showcase Wednesday evening from 5:30 to 8pm. The Educator workshop is one portion of the larger ESIP 2019 Summer Meeting in Tacoma Washington and educators are welcome all week!
Teachers participating will receive a stipend of $200 (thanks to NOAA). More information and registration at https://2019esipsummermeeting.sched.com/info.


Speakers
avatar for LuAnn Dahlman

LuAnn Dahlman

Science Writer and Editor, NOAA Climate Program Office
The updated Climate Explorer application.
avatar for Sean Gordon

Sean Gordon

Information Engineer, The HDF Group
Talk to me about the ESIP Labs project, ESIPhub a JupyterHub based shared computational environment for workshops at Meetings.My research focuses on the connections between documentation structures and the evaluation of content for the metadata needs of diverse communities of practice... Read More →
avatar for Shelley Olds

Shelley Olds

Science Education Specialist, UNAVCO
Data visualization tools, Earth science education, human dimensions of natural hazards, disaster risk reduction (DRR), resilience building.



Wednesday July 17, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Room 315

1:30pm

Open Forum IGSN 2040: Maturing a PID Organization toward Sustainability
Globally unique, persistent, and resolvable identifiers (PIDs) are now an essential component of the modern research ecosystem and are used for many types of digital objects and research artefacts including data, software, samples, and instruments. The International Geo Sample Number (IGSN) is a specialized PID for physical samples that ensures unambiguous citation and tracking of these samples and links them to data and publications.  Originally developed for the Earth Sciences, the IGSN has evolved into an international PID system and is increasingly adopted by other disciplines that need to refer to physical samples. The growing number and range of stakeholders worldwide include, but are not limited to, researchers, collection curators, and data managers.

To date, nearly 6.9 million samples have been registered with IGSN. As the audience expands and the adoption rate accelerates, the governance and business models of the system need to be reassessed to support this growth. The IGSN 2040 project, funded in 2018 by an award from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, has enabled the participation of an international group of experts, from multiple domains, to re-design and improve the existing organization and technical architecture of the IGSN. The goal is to be able to respond to and support, in a sustainable manner, the rapidly growing demands of an increasingly multi-disciplinary samples user community in a landscape of maturing research data infrastructures.

The IGSN 2040 team invites the ESIP community to participate in an open forum to explore solutions for a scalable and sustainable future of the IGSN. This discussion will begin broad addressing essential criteria for trustworthiness and sustainability for PIDs in the rapidly growing global unique, persistent, and resolvable identifier (UPRI)  ecosystem,  and narrow to focus on the optimal organizational foundations needed to ensure longevity, scalability and effective governance of the IGSN.  The results of this discussion will inform the work of the IGSN 2040 Governance Steering Committee Meeting, which is colocated with the 2019 ESIP Summer meeting.

Moderators
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
Kerstin Lehnert is Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of the NSF-funded data facility IEDA (Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance). Kerstin holds a Ph.D in Petrology from the University of Freiburg in Germany... Read More →

Wednesday July 17, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Room 316

1:30pm

Large/Mission Scale Multiplatform Data Working Group
The NASA ESDIS Large/Mission Scale Multiplatform Data Working Group considers "pain" related to size and/or multiple platforms in supporting science for large mission scale analysis projects and works to understand it's root causes and work towards mitigations. Example NASA Program elements using large data are ACCESS and MEaSUREs.
The working group has just begun and is interesting in collecting pain points to analyze, understand and work on. In the session we will present our work so far, and collect input on both “pain” and comments about results so far.


Wednesday July 17, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Room 317

1:30pm

netCDF-CF Workshop Part IV
This is part 4 of a 4 part workshop. The Climate and Forecast (CF) metadata convention for netCDF (netCDF-CF) is a community-developed standard first released in 2003. The CF conventions were originally developed to represent climate and forecast model output encoded in the netCDF binary format, with the specific goal of facilitating comparison of output from different models. Subsequent development of the convention has broadened its scope to include observational data and derived products.

This workshop will focus on discussing current and future efforts and directions for the CF conventions.

Speakers
avatar for Jessica Hausman

Jessica Hausman

Data Engineer, PO.DAAC JPL
AJ

Aleksandar Jelenak

The HDF Group
KO

Kevin O'Brien

NOAA and Univ. of Washington
DH

David Hassell

University of Reading
avatar for Daniel Lee

Daniel Lee

Software and data foramt engineer, EUMETSAT
GC

Guilherme Castelao

Scripps Institution of Oceanography
avatar for Ethan Davis

Ethan Davis

UCAR Unidata


Wednesday July 17, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Room 318

3:00pm

Break
Wednesday July 17, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TCC

3:30pm

Metadata harvesting through schema.org
Repositories have recognized the benefits of adopting schema.org metadata in their data catalog landing pages to improve discoverability, particularly with the incentive of inclusion in the Google Dataset search. While Google supports broad, general search and discovery, we can also use this mechanism to improve domain-specific aggregated search systems like DataONE. In this working session, we will focus on real world issues of implementing schema.org for repositories, how to link traditional metadata records into dataset landing pages, and how this can result in improved harvesting and representation by science focused aggregators such as DataONE. We will work through recommendations emerging from science-on-schema.org, optimizing JSON-LD to work with major search engines, and options for extending to include more detailed dataset information beyond the typical discovery-level metadata found in most records.

Moderators
avatar for Matt Jones

Matt Jones

Director, DataONE Program, DataONE, UC Santa Barbara
DataONE | Arctic Data Center | Open Science | Provenance and Semantics | Scientific Synthesis

Wednesday July 17, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Ballrm A

3:30pm

Data Citations: What Makes a Good Citation?
Citing data is important as it provides credit to the producers, better transparency in reproducibility of work and applies to FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reproducible). As most researchers know how to cite scientific writings, citing data is not as obvious or well practiced. Therefore most data repositories are providing citation formats for their datasets so users will know how data should be cited. Repositories are also registering PIDs, typically DOIs for the datasets as tracking the PID is much easier than the actual citation text in an article. But why do the citations and registered PIDs contain the information they contain? This session will look at the citation formats registered information that goes into a PID at USGS, NOAA, NASA and other repositories. We will then compare the various citations and see why differences, if there are any, exist. Is it due to available metadata, community driven, funder driven, etc.?

Moderators
avatar for Jessica Hausman

Jessica Hausman

Data Engineer, PO.DAAC JPL

Speakers
avatar for Heather Brown

Heather Brown

Archive Data Management Specialist, ERT for NESDIS/NCEI


Wednesday July 17, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Ballrm BC

3:30pm

Scalable, data-proximate cloud computing for Earth Science research
Data intensive scientific workflows are at a pivotal time in which traditional local computing resources are no longer capable of meeting the storage or computing demands of scientists. In the Earth Sciences, we are facing an explosion of data volumes sourced from models, in-situ observations, and remote sensing platforms. Some agencies are starting to move data to commercial Cloud providers to facilitate access (e.g. NASA on Amazon Web Services). Fully leveraging these opportunities will require new approaches in the way the scientific community handles data access, processing and analysis. In particular, we need to stop downloading data and start uploading algorithms to wherever large archives reside. This session is targeted at researchers who pioneering such “data-proximate” computing on commercial Cloud infrastructure. We hope to hear current success stories, as well as failures, and identify ways to improve existing workflows.

Moderators
avatar for Rich Signell

Rich Signell

Oceanographer, USGS
Ocean Modeling, Python, NetCDF, THREDDS, ERDDAP, UGRID, SGRID, CF-Conventions, Jupyter, JupyterHub, CSW, TerriaJS

Speakers

Wednesday July 17, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Ballrm D

3:30pm

Data to Action Teacher Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

The full workshop now begins at 1pm

3:30 - 4:45 pm session:  SuAVE Survey Analysis via Visual Exploration


Data in Action with Jupyter Notebooks and other Earth Science Tools

JOIN US for an afternoon deep-dive into two cutting-edge data science activities. First, we’ll use Jupyter Notebooks to investigate a 100-year hurricane dataset, modifying code to dig deeper. We’ll also examine GOES weather satellite tools, art history, geosciences, and biodiversity data-sets using the SuAVE visual exploration tool.
  • 1:00 pm - Introductions, ESIP Overview & Intro to Block Coding with Jupyter Notebooks
  • 1:15 pm - GOES-16/17 RGB Activity from NOAA CIMSS
  • 1:30 pm Jupyter Notebooks Hurricane Activity
  • 3:00 pm - Break
  • 3:30 pm - SuAVE Survey Analysis via Visual Exploration
  • 4:45 pm - Wrap-up and Evaluations
  • 5:30 pm (optional) - Research Showcase
Participating teachers are warmly invited and strongly encouraged to attend the Research Showcase Wednesday evening from 5:30 to 8pm. The Educator workshop is one portion of the larger ESIP 2019 Summer Meeting in Tacoma Washington and educators are welcome all week!
Teachers participating will receive a stipend of $200 (thanks to NOAA). More information and registration at https://2019esipsummermeeting.sched.com/info.


Speakers
avatar for LuAnn Dahlman

LuAnn Dahlman

Science Writer and Editor, NOAA Climate Program Office
The updated Climate Explorer application.
avatar for Sean Gordon

Sean Gordon

Information Engineer, The HDF Group
Talk to me about the ESIP Labs project, ESIPhub a JupyterHub based shared computational environment for workshops at Meetings.My research focuses on the connections between documentation structures and the evaluation of content for the metadata needs of diverse communities of practice... Read More →
avatar for Shelley Olds

Shelley Olds

Science Education Specialist, UNAVCO
Data visualization tools, Earth science education, human dimensions of natural hazards, disaster risk reduction (DRR), resilience building.



Wednesday July 17, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 315

3:30pm

Help Us Help You! Developing Data Pathfinders at Earthdata.nasa.gov
The NASA Earth Science Data Systems Program, which manages NASA’s Earth science data collections, is currently working to improve the discoverability of its data holdings and information through the earthdata.nasa.gov website. To this end, we have developed several data pathfinders that focus on a variety of themes in which remote Earth observation data can provide an added dimension to ground-based observations for forecasting, monitoring and responding to climate-related events. Currently we have data pathfinders for Agriculture and Water Resources, Health and Air Quality, and Wildfires.

In this interactive working session, we would like to learn about your data needs and ask you to test our new data pathfinders. Your valuable feedback will be used to improve our tools and increase the discoverability of NASA Earth science data.

Moderators
avatar for Teddy Gelabert

Teddy Gelabert

Web Strategist, NASA ESDS/SSAI
Earthdata user information needs and how to meet them via the web.
avatar for Cynthia Hall

Cynthia Hall

Community Coordinator, NASA Earth Science Data Systems/SSAI
Accessing and using NASA Earth science data through Earthdata
avatar for Kevin Ward

Kevin Ward

NASA Earth Observatory

Wednesday July 17, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 316

3:30pm

The Critical Zones: Supporting Place Based Research
We look at the history of data management for the the NSF CZO Network, a NSF funded network of sites focused on how components of the Critical Zone interact, shape Earth's surface, and support life. Each site has their own data management practices, with a central catalog aggregating information about well curated datasets. Each site leverages specific technologies such as Dendra, Geodashboard, Clowder, etc. We will discuss some of these local approaches and how in the last few years there has been an attempt at improving the central catalog by leveraging efforts such as CUAHSI HydroShare, together with some future looking approaches for a better federated data manager package.

Moderators
avatar for Ben Galewsky

Ben Galewsky

Research Programmer, National Center for Supercomputing Applications

Speakers

Wednesday July 17, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Room 317

5:30pm

Research Showcase
Research Showcase on the evening of July 17th. This evening reception will provide participants with a wide variety of options for sharing their work - they can share posters, demo tools, and we also encourage them to use visual media to present their data and research as art.

Wednesday July 17, 2019 5:30pm - 8:00pm
TCC

8:00pm

End of Day 2
Wednesday July 17, 2019 8:00pm - 8:00pm
TCC
 
Thursday, July 18
 

8:00am

Morning Plenary
Lightning talks from Lab-funded projects and plenary talks from Kelsey Jordahl and Jim Bednar.

Kelsey Jordahl, Talk Title: TBD

Jim Bednar, Talk Title: PyViz Tools for Geoscience: Easy, Flexible, High-Performance, Browser-Based Visualizations in Python

Speakers
avatar for Kelsey Jordahl

Kelsey Jordahl

Director, Data Pipeline Team, Planet
Kelsey Jordahl is the Director of the Data Pipeline team at Planet. Planet operates the largest private constellation of satellites in the world, including over 150 earth observation satellites, and processes terabytes of data every day. Prior to joining Planet in 2015, he worked... Read More →
avatar for Jim Bednar

Jim Bednar

Leader, PyVis Group, Anaconda
Dr. James A. Bednar was a faculty member in the School of Informatics at the University of Edinburgh from 2003 to 2015, and is currently Manager, Technical Services at Anaconda, Inc. At Anaconda, Jim is the project lead of a variety of open-source packages under the PyViz.org banner... Read More →


Thursday July 18, 2019 8:00am - 10:00am
TCC

8:00am

IGSN2040 Steering Committee Meeting (Closed Meeting)
Speakers
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
Kerstin Lehnert is Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of the NSF-funded data facility IEDA (Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance). Kerstin holds a Ph.D in Petrology from the University of Freiburg in Germany... Read More →


Thursday July 18, 2019 8:00am - 5:00pm
Room 315

10:00am

Break
Thursday July 18, 2019 10:00am - 10:30am
TCC

10:30am

Meet The Maintainers: commoning for data infrastructure durability
Because they care about and for the infrastructure that houses every bit of data, every byte of the cloud, and every line of code, maintainers sustain the technology infrastructure that makes Earth data use possible. Maintainers work in many arenas, of course, they keep energy grids up, roadways repaired, buildings secure. Data infrastructure experts are now in conversations with other maintainers. Recently, a group of maintainers: technicians, engineers, historians, social scientists, sysadmins (the ones you call on to reboot the system when it’s down) started a conversation and created a group called The Maintainers. With support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, ESIP is bringing the Maintainer conversation to Tacoma. We’ve invited several of them to talk about the real issues involved in stewarding hardware and systems, not just data. By caring for your hardware, they let you focus on other tasks. Join us to discover how ESIP’s goals of sustaining the Earth science data endeavor rely upon those who chose not to innovate today, but rather to navigate the problematics of keeping everything running most of the time.

Invited Speakers:

Emily Jane Sylak-Glassman: ”The Importance of Maintaining Earth Observational Data for Long-Term Climate Record Reconstruction"
Daniella Lowenberg: “Maintaining and Growing Research Data Publishing at CDL & Dryad”
Jason A. Gallo: “The Scale and Value of Earth Observation Infrastructure”
Fred C. Beach: “U.S. Energy Infrastructure: ‘what’s past is prologue’“


Speakers

Thursday July 18, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Ballrm A

10:30am

Current Approaches for Tracking and Exposing Research Object Usage Metrics
Many publishers and funders have implemented open data policies in efforts to make research more transparent and re-usable. These policies also aim to support data, software, and other research objects as valuable output of the research process. To begin to assess impact and give credit to researchers for sharing research objects, however, the community needs to take additional steps to promote standardized measurement of research object usage and proper citation. This means different things for different stakeholders: researchers need to be informed on how and why research object citations should be included in articles and other publications, publishers need to promote and index research object citations, repositories need to standardize and display research object usage information, and institutions need to value these metrics.

Several stakeholders have begun improving capabilities for tracking and exposing research object usage metrics. For example, Make Data Count highlights the value of research data by providing the infrastructure for repositories to display data usage and citation metrics. The project has worked with COUNTER to develop a Code of Practice to enable standardization and has also developed mechanisms for repositories to expose data usage metrics, including implementation examples from California Digital Library, the Arctic Data Center, and DataONE. In this session, we will hear 1) how repositories are currently tracking research object citations, and 2) how the Make Data Count project and other efforts can help these repositories standardize their reporting approach to support accurate representation of the value of research objects.

Moderators
avatar for Bob Downs

Bob Downs

CIESIN
Dr. Robert R. Downs serves as the senior digital archivist and acting head of cyberinfrastructure and informatics research and development at CIESIN, the Center for International Earth Science Information Network, a research and data center of the Earth Institute of Columbia University... Read More →
avatar for Matt Jones

Matt Jones

Director, DataONE Program, DataONE, UC Santa Barbara
DataONE | Arctic Data Center | Open Science | Provenance and Semantics | Scientific Synthesis

Thursday July 18, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Ballrm BC

10:30am

Challenges and Opportunities in Adopting Cloud technologies for Data Intensive Science
The amount of data generated by public and private sector organizations has increased many fold in the last decade. In recent years, consumers and providers of data are faced with an increasing challenge of managing the quantity and quality of information produced. The advent of cloud technologies has been a boon for the big data era offering a solution for the information overload. While cloud technologies have provided an excellent opportunity, challenges and opportunities on utilizing cloud technologies are still to be explored. The complex business/infrastructure aspect of the cloud technologies paradigm and the rapid changes in the technical development have made transitions complex and confusing at times. In this session, we hope to share case studies of migration/utilization of cloud technologies for data intensive science. The challenges and opportunities revealed by those case studies we hope will inform stakeholders, collaborators, and other interested parties. We hope that the lessons learned will inform future work and help expedite progress in the field of Earth Science informatics.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Thomas Huang

Thomas Huang

Technical Group Supervisor, JPL
avatar for Chris Lynnes

Chris Lynnes

Systems Engineer, NASA


Thursday July 18, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Ballrm D

10:30am

Advanced Geospatial Cyberinfrastructure for Deep Learning
The deep stack and tremendous amount of computational parameters in deep learning models greatly increases the challenges of pre-processing, training, testing, and post- processing geospatial datasets quickly and efficiently. This session will discuss the latest progresses on constructing advanced cyberinfrastructure for deep learning on satellite-based or field-observed geospatial datasets. The goal is to bring community experiences together and collaborate on building advanced geospatial cyberinfrastructure addressing the big questions raised in solving fundamental geoscience problems using deep learning models.

Moderators
avatar for Annie Burgess

Annie Burgess

ESIP Lab Director, ESIP

Speakers

Thursday July 18, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 316

10:30am

Multi-sensor data integration for cryosphere and hydrosphere monitoring
In keeping with this year’s Summer Meeting theme of “Increasing the Use and Value of Earth Science Data and Information,” this session aims to explore different data streams used for monitoring of the hydrosphere and cryosphere. Earth science data for water resources monitoring has existed as field collected data, remote sensing, modeled and in situ data for decades but relatively recent increases in computational capabilities (e.g. cloud computing platforms), data storage and integration and processing methods like machine learning have allowed researchers to ask a suite of questions that rely on data from multiple sources and typologies to answer complex questions about water resources critical to humans and ecosystems. To emphasize the ‘use and value of earth science data’ this session will incorporate presentations on data generation and processing methods as well as applied uses of data products for water resources monitoring.

Moderators
Thursday July 18, 2019 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 318

12:00pm

Lunch
Thursday July 18, 2019 12:00pm - 1:30pm
TCC

1:30pm

ESIP Geoscience Community Ontology Engineering Workshop (GCOEW)
The field of Ontology engineering in computer science and information science is a field which studies the methods and methodologies for building ontologies: formal representations of a set of concepts within a domain and the relationships between those concepts. This workshop will crowdsource definitions for the SWEET Ontology Suite. Attendees should come prepared and ready to work on harvesting definitions for existing SWEET concepts.

Moderators
Speakers

Thursday July 18, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Ballrm A

1:30pm

How to build your data "groups" for optimal discovery?
How does your Earth Science community define a collection that is discoverable in catalogs AND  yet can be simply understood by humans? Many areas need to be evaluated such as definitions, elements, vocabularies and more...oh, my!  Help us create a cheat sheet to help the data management community by having fun.

Speakers
avatar for Anna Milan

Anna Milan

NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI)
~*~Metadata Adds Meaning~*~
avatar for Heather Brown

Heather Brown

Archive Data Management Specialist, ERT for NESDIS/NCEI


Thursday July 18, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Ballrm BC

1:30pm

Geospatial Data Analytics and Visualization for Sustainability in the Cloud
Sustainability’s geospatial processes are complex since environmental, societal, and economic systems are deeply interconnected. This creates challenges for researchers working in this field because the impact from changes in one system are not always well understood or predictable for the other systems. As a result, extracting timely and meaningful insights for sustainable environmental decision making often requires large datasets from many different domains, and tools capable of capturing the multidimensional nature of the problem. To address these challenges, many users are exploring the use of cloud computing to leverage its scalable storage and geospatial analytical capabilities. In this session, we are soliciting presentations that utilizes cloud-based workflows and applications of GIS technology to derive insights for sustainability.

Moderators
Thursday July 18, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Ballrm D

1:30pm

An ESIP community's working session on machine learning: introducing adoptable use cases and beyond
The ESIP ML cluster is creating some use cases for learning about machine. This working session is to introduce our working use cases and framework and seek feedback.

The cluster is also interesting in hearing from machine learning experts. We’ll use some of this session to share knowledge about about potential speakers.

Moderators
Thursday July 18, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Room 316

1:30pm

HDF Town Hall
Data in HDF file formats continues to play an important role for Earth Scientists in the U.S. and around the world. The HDF Group will update ESIP members on the state of HDF software and HDF5 Roadmap, and will share our experience on working with HDF5 in the Cloud. We will discuss our technical approaches, and lessons learned from different projects including a NASA ACCESS project that transformed NASA HDF data into GeoTIFF in AWS. We will also update ESIP members on our involvement in standardization efforts and demonstrate how HDF tools support ESDIS data from product initial design to production, and to compliance with the standards. We will encourage ESIP members participating in the session to share their experiences with the HDF software and to contribute to the HDF5 Roadmap.

Moderators
AJ

Aleksandar Jelenak

The HDF Group

Speakers

Thursday July 18, 2019 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Room 318

3:00pm

Break
Thursday July 18, 2019 3:00pm - 3:30pm
TCC

3:30pm

Data Risk Matrix Do-A-Thon I
Defining risks for data can be a daunting task. The risk factors for data collections may vary from collection to collection, or vary over time for a single collection. These factors could additionally vary by the priorities and resources available at any given time. The Data Stewardship Committee held a session at the ESIP Summer Meeting 2018 (https://2018esipsummermeeting.sched.com/event/Eypr/building-a-data-risk-factor-matrix) where participants undertook a “card sorting” exercise, an established method for developing categorizations of concepts. The outcome of that exercise indicated more than one way to categorize data risks, thus indicating that any approach may need adjustment depending on the situation at hand.

This working session is intended to further develop and evolve the Data Risk Categorization Matrix (http://bit.ly/2IX3VM5) begun by the Data Stewardship Committee, and to work through test cases for its application. We invite volunteers to use the Categorization Matrix on a data collection they are familiar with prior to the session, then during the session we will discuss issues, comments, concerns, or improvements to the matrix. Participants are encouraged to bring information on a data collection to the session to conduct live assessments with input from other participants.

Moderators
avatar for Denise Hills

Denise Hills

Director, Energy Investigations, Geological Survey of Alabama
Long tail data, data preservation, connecting physical samples to digital information, geoscience policy, science communication

Thursday July 18, 2019 3:30pm - 4:15pm
Ballrm BC

3:30pm

Unconference
An "unconference" is particularly useful when participants generally have a high level of expertise or knowledge in the field the conference convenes to discuss. So ESIP is the perfect place to unconference!

At the ESIP unconference, the agenda is created by the attendees through the first 2.5 days of the meeting. Anyone who wants to initiate a discussion on a topic can add ideas to the Unconference board at Registration. Participants will also have dots included with their name badges. You can vote on your preferred sessions throughout the first 2.5 days. At lunch, before this session starts we will co-create the schedule based on session popularity and attendee input. There will be 4x40 min unconference slots with 10 minutes to move between session during each unconference block.

ESIP unconference sessions are led by the participant who suggested its topic; Sessions can also be geared around working on a particular topic, hack-a-thon, whatever you need at this point in the meeting, make it your session!


Thursday July 18, 2019 3:30pm - 5:00pm
TCC

4:15pm

Data Risk Matrix Do-A-Thon II
Defining risks for data can be a daunting task. The risk factors for data collections may vary from collection to collection, or vary over time for a single collection. These factors could additionally vary by the priorities and resources available at any given time. The Data Stewardship Committee held a session at the ESIP Summer Meeting 2018 (https://2018esipsummermeeting.sched.com/event/Eypr/building-a-data-risk-factor-matrix) where participants undertook a “card sorting” exercise, an established method for developing categorizations of concepts. The outcome of that exercise indicated more than one way to categorize data risks, thus indicating that any approach may need adjustment depending on the situation at hand.

This working session is intended to further develop and evolve the Data Risk Categorization Matrix (http://bit.ly/2IX3VM5) begun by the Data Stewardship Committee, and to work through test cases for its application. We invite volunteers to use the Categorization Matrix on a data collection they are familiar with prior to the session, then during the session we will discuss issues, comments, concerns, or improvements to the matrix. Participants are encouraged to bring information on a data collection to the session to conduct live assessments with input from other participants.

Moderators
avatar for Denise Hills

Denise Hills

Director, Energy Investigations, Geological Survey of Alabama
Long tail data, data preservation, connecting physical samples to digital information, geoscience policy, science communication

Thursday July 18, 2019 4:15pm - 5:00pm
Ballrm BC

5:00pm

Unconference Wrap-up
We will come back to plenary for a quick session to report out on key insights, lessons learned and anything that is being carried forward. This could be great fodder for FUNding Friday team forming and poster making too!

We will also enjoy the Climate Fables Virtual Reality Project & Fashion Show

Thursday July 18, 2019 5:00pm - 5:30pm
TCC

6:30pm

FUNding Friday Poster Making Session
Join us at 7 Seas to make a poster or find a team + make a poster for FUNding Friday (FF).

FUNding Friday is an annual mini-grant competition associated with ESIP’s Summer Meeting. The mini-grants are available to ESIP members ($5000) and to students and Education Committee workshop participants ($3000), with total number of awards specified annually and generally 2-4 awards per participant group.

Interested participants must exhibit a poster describing the project during the Poster Pitch session (Friday morning, check the Summer Meeting schedule for specific time and place). The poster should be hung in the provided space before the pitch session begins.

The poster size is limited to 25 by 30 inches. It can be hand-drawn; materials for the posters are provided to interested participants during the FF Poster event Thursday night.

Thursday July 18, 2019 6:30pm - 8:30pm
7 Seas Brewery 2101 Jefferson Ave, Tacoma, WA 98402

8:00pm

End of Day 3
Thursday July 18, 2019 8:00pm - 8:00pm
TCC
 
Friday, July 19
 

8:00am

FUNding FRIDAY & Morning Plenary
  • FUNding Friday Pitches
  • Increasing Earth Data Usage through Public Data and Machine Learning
    Shane Glass, Google
  • Best-value Data-intensive Analysis Architecture Deduced Using “Geo-lly” Beans
    Kwo-Sen Kuo, UMD/NASA Goddard/Bayesics LLC

Speakers
avatar for Kwo-Sen Kuo

Kwo-Sen Kuo

UMD/NASA Goddard/Bayesics LLC
Kwo-Sen Kuo is a “disruptive thinker” (commonly known as “boat-rocker” or “troublemaker”) because he likes to question the existing ways of doing things. Although he considers that to be completely rational, it is not always appreciated as so by others. His disruptiveness... Read More →
avatar for Shane Glass

Shane Glass

Public Data Lead, Google
Shane is a program manager with Google Cloud's Developer Relations, where he leads the Google Cloud Public Datasets Program. The Cloud Public Datasets Program facilitates access to high-demand public datasets in order to make it easy for data users to access and uncover new insights... Read More →


Friday July 19, 2019 8:00am - 9:45am
TCC

8:00am

IGSN2040 Steering Committee Meeting (Closed Meeting)
Speakers
avatar for Kerstin Lehnert

Kerstin Lehnert

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University
Kerstin Lehnert is Senior Research Scientist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University and Director of the NSF-funded data facility IEDA (Interdisciplinary Earth Data Alliance). Kerstin holds a Ph.D in Petrology from the University of Freiburg in Germany... Read More →


Friday July 19, 2019 8:00am - 1:00pm
Room 315

9:45am

Break
Friday July 19, 2019 9:45am - 10:00am
TCC

10:00am

Conceptual modeling for earth science
Data repositories often rely upon conceptual models that provide formal representation information and identity conditions for digital resources -- for instance, the ontologies that underlie semantic data, or conceptual models like FRBR that underlie digital libraries. Though these later two cases represent extremely well documented conceptual models, there are many other instances where underlying conceptual models are tacit or inexplicit, and rarely published by practitioners and researchers. This makes it hard to build on one another's work, identify weaknesses in our models or modeling approaches, or forge new innovative collaborations. Furthermore, even in cases were conceptual models are well articulated, we believe there is a need for further discussion related to the methods used in modeling work, and the open research questions regarding conceptual modeling.

To that end, we'd like to see ESIP become a home for conversations about conceptual modeling for earth science data! We (https://sig-cm.github.io) are a group of information scientists who believe that sustaining a rich tradition of research and development in conceptual modeling in LIS requires collaboration with, and contributions from, communities like ESIP. This session would be the second in a series of interdisciplinary workshops, panels, and working sessions with the goal of building community and a research agenda around conceptual modeling work in libraries, archives, museums, and data repositories.

Plan for session:
- short lightning talks from presenters, setting the stage and outlining the topic
- a working session, in which participants are split into small groups to discuss areas of unmet need, and develop research questions, possible future research/development directions for ESIP + conceptual/data modeling efforts.

Moderators
Friday July 19, 2019 10:00am - 11:30am
Ballrm A

10:00am

Location, Location, Location: Enabling Data Discovery by Place
Controlled vocabularies and ontologies are used to annotate datasets in the environmental sciences to improve data discoverability. However, they typically focus on data content and uses, rather than the location where data is collected. Although selecting terms for the theme of a dataset is usually straightforward, identifying terms for the location of data collection is a more complicated issue. Places where research is conducted vary by location and in size. Some named locations may be subsumed by other named locations (e.g., a city in a state) and sometimes multiple names need to be specified to be clear (e.g., Springfield, IL, USA vs. Springfield, MO, USA vs. Springfield, ON, CA). Moreover many geographic name databases work well for terrestrial locations, but not for aquatic ones (e.g., coral reefs). The nearest named place from a gazetteer may be quite distant from a study site in the wilderness. Additionally, data for a given study may be collected in many distinct locations with intervening gaps in between. For discoverability, is it preferable to identify a place as part of a study where many types of data are collected, or as a set of coordinates? In this working group, we will consider use cases from the perspective of environmental researchers to evaluate how well gazetteers and other resources such as the NGA GEOnet Names Server (GNS) could enable data discovery by researchers searching for data. Our aim is to provide recommendations for specifying location using geographic naming resources, or failing that, to better define how various resources might be evaluated for fitness.


Moderators
Friday July 19, 2019 10:00am - 11:30am
Ballrm BC

10:00am

Current Status in Cloud Data Access
Cloud computing holds the promise of novel data analysis capabilities for geoscientists by providing affordable on-demand computing system resources. One of the major differences with the traditional computing systems is web-based object storage which requires new data access methods with a different set of performance parameters.

The aim of this session is to provide the ESIP community with an opportunity to learn about the current capabilities for accessing data in cloud object stores. The emphasis will be on the actual software, data servers or libraries, which are capable of accessing cloud object stores, performance issues and bottlenecks, and best practices that can be adopted when migrating data to the cloud. When considering end-user applications, this session is about how those tools access data from the novel data storage systems available with cloud computing and not about the algorithms, etc., associated with data visualization, analytics, or machine learning.

Moderators
JG

James Gallagher

President, OPeNDAP
AJ

Aleksandar Jelenak

The HDF Group

Friday July 19, 2019 10:00am - 11:30am
Ballrm D

10:00am

Preparing climate and hydrological time series data for submission to CUAHSI
In this working session we will introduce CUAHSI Data services to manage point time series data, such as streamflow and precipitation. This standardized data format will enable data synthesis and comparison across different sites and locations. Specifically, we will demonstrate how to convert a climate dataset into this format and upload to CUAHSI’s data repository. Participants may follow along using their own data. Please bring one year’s worth of climate station data in your local format to this working session along with a laptop containing your favorite scripting environment. We will also provide an example dataset and expertise in various scripting languages. The goal is for a data manager to obtain a good understanding of the workflow involved for converting their local climate station data for submission to CUAHSI’s data repository.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Margaret O'Brien

Margaret O'Brien

Data Manager, University of California, Santa Barbara


Friday July 19, 2019 10:00am - 11:30am
Room 316

10:00am

Community Ontology Repository (COR) Administration, Development and Planning
This session will consist of two main themes: discussion of current and pending important administrative tasks; and hands-on exercises covering the development aspect toward improvement of the software itself, as well as possible complementary tools that could be integrated (e.g., ontology viewers/visualizers). Participants will gain understanding of how this particular instance of the ORR software is deployed on Amazon and how they can contribute in various ways including further core development and integration of new tools and client libraries to leverage the powerful API and SPARQL endpoint capabilities of the COR server.

Moderators
avatar for Annie Burgess

Annie Burgess

ESIP Lab Director, ESIP

Speakers

Friday July 19, 2019 10:00am - 11:30am
Room 317

10:00am

Surprising and Novel Ways to Integrate Community Data Systems with Each Other
We know all the standard mechanisms for integrating data systems with each other: standards, APIs, standards-based APIs, etc., etc., etc. But new possibilities are opening up due to new technologies and approaches: Jupyter, Eclipse Che, Everything-as-a-Service, Slack, JSON-LD... Do you have a novel integration mechanism you want more developers to adopt so we can hook more things together? Come to this session and talk it up!

Agenda:
  • Dave Blodgett (USGS) - Environmental Linked Features Interoperability Experiment (ELFIE)
  • Kevin O'Brien/Bob Simons (NOAA/PMEL) - Integrating Data with ERDDAP
  • Namrata Malarout (NASA/JPL) - Centralized MAAP* API: Simplifying Algorithm Collaboration
  • Daven Quinn (U. Wisconsin) - Sparrow: an in-house, interoperable data system for individual geochronology labs

*MAAP = Multi-mission Algorithm and Analysis Platform

Speakers
avatar for Chris Lynnes

Chris Lynnes

Systems Engineer, NASA


Friday July 19, 2019 10:00am - 11:30am
Room 318

11:45am

Identifying Trusted Data Sources for Operational Decision Making & the Role of “Fitness for Use” as ORL Criteria
The Disaster Lifecycle cluster is hosting a breakout session to explore sources of trusted datasets from various agencies and what constitutes operational readiness for these data. A key issue is how ‘Fitness for Use’ criteria can apply across ORLs, the Operational Readiness Levels.

With FEMA’s encouragement, collaborators at the All Hazards Consortium are “operationalizing” ORLs for data-driven decision-making support to improve situational awareness in response to power outages, transportation, fuel and lodging after major disasters. An interesting development is the need to assign fixed ORLs to datasets, rather than determining the ORL value based on specific use cases. The GIS ORL team within the Sensitive Information Sharing Environment (SISE) committee of the Fleet Response Working Group (FRWG) recognizes that latency, resolution, and coverage features have a significant impact on dataset readiness for most critical infrastructure and many weather and other EO datasets. However the inherent confusion that changing a trusted dataset’s ORL assessment creates a bigger problem for operator training and response efforts. Currently, most of their critical datasets are logistical in nature (what roads have been closed by state authorities, where can truck drivers get fuel/ food/ lodging, where are the authorized staging locations, etc.) and amenable to fixed ORLs assignments.

The recent wildfires in CA and associated mud and debris flows are impacting lives and property. Earthquake exercises are leading to data needs by decision makers that can drive situational awareness and decision making criteria. For example, soil condition information in burn scar areas is critical for NWS forecasters to know so they can accurately identify rainfall thresholds for issuing flood warnings in burn scar areas.

Looking forward to successfully using more trusted EO data for disaster operations, we plan to hear about current and planned datasets for disaster response needs. We are also seeking ways to clarify fitness for use criteria (especially latency, resolution and coverage) for these datasets that otherwise would meet the current readiness criteria of ORL1.

Moderators
Friday July 19, 2019 11:45am - 1:15pm
Ballrm A

11:45am

Improving Airborne Data Discovery and Use
Airborne earth observations are typically collected in field campaigns aimed at satellite data validation or intensive observation of a particular geophysical feature or physical relationship. This results in a wealth of coincident observations of Earth system processes from a wide variety of instruments. However, these heterogeneous data have diverse temporal and spatial scales, variables, and data formats and organization. Compared to satellite data, airborne data typically have a much smaller user community and consist of more data types containing fewer and smaller data files. In many cases, the users of airborne data may be limited to just those involved with the airborne campaign due to the complexity of the data and the difficulty visualizing and using the data. Individual data centers have developed their own particular way of serving the needs of a particular community of airborne data users effectively. In this session, we aim to bring together data providers and data users to gather effective ideas for broadening airborne data user communities beyond the campaign scientists. The session will have a few invited speakers to share ideas and will conclude with discussion time to explore participant ideas and methods for improving the discovery and use of airborne data.

Speakers will include:
Heather Holbach (NOAA/AOML/HRD) Hurricane airborne data use/issues
Tristan Goulden (NEON)  Ecological airborne data use/issues
Jeff Deems  (NSIDC)  Snow and Ice airborne data use/issues
Helen Conover (UAH/ITSC) - Technology examples for airborne data exploration

Speakers
HH

Heather Holbach

NOAA/AOML/HRD
avatar for Deborah Smith

Deborah Smith

Airborne Data Management Group, IMPACT/ UAH
I am the lead scientist of the IMPACT Airborne Data Mangement Group (ADMG). I work towards improving airborne data knowledge, use, access and value.
avatar for Helen Conover

Helen Conover

ESDIS Standards Office, UAH/ITSC
Data stewardship, metadata, standards, lightning observations from space


Friday July 19, 2019 11:45am - 1:15pm
Ballrm BC

11:45am

Beyond the cookbook: Connecting workflows, data and people for sustainable interdisciplinary Earth Sciences
This interactive workshop intends to add to the Throughput cookbook, by having participants work through and annotate workflows. Additionally, participants will use the API to look at the networks already built to ascertain what additional tools are needed to make sense of it all.

Moderators
Friday July 19, 2019 11:45am - 1:15pm
Ballrm D

11:45am

Data Management Training Clearinghouse Advisory Board Meeting (Continuing through lunch)
The Third Quarter 2019 Advisory Board for the ESIP-hosted and IMLS (Institute of Museum & Library Services) grant funded Data Management Training Clearinghouse would like to hold a face to face meeting at ESIP Summer. AB meetings are scheduled for each quarter of the year, and this would be the first time that AB members meet face to face (although remote participation would also be welcomed). Part of the impetus for the face to face meeting is to bring those board members to an ESIP meeting who have not yet had the opportunity to attend. Ideally, the meeting could be held for about 3 hours on the Friday after the ESIP meeting in hopes that more members could attend both.

Moderators
KB

Karl Benedict

ESIP President, ESIP
The ESIP President is a volunteer position, elected by the ESIP Community each year. The President works with the ESIP Staff for several of the presentation, speaker introductions, award ceremonies, and other speaking/participating aspects of ESIP meetings throughout the year.

Friday July 19, 2019 11:45am - 1:15pm
Room 316

11:45am

Semantic Technologies Committee Business Meeting
As the adoption of the FAIR principles accelerates, the use of semantic resources by research and operational communities worldwide is intensifying. There is thus a pressing need to coordinate our semantic development efforts in the Earth science community such that we can maintain diversity, reduce duplication of effort, and present a more unified and demonstrably interoperable interface to external stakeholders.

We will use this session to address the need above, and develop a plan to link our activities to emerging semantic frameworks in Earth observation, such as the UN Sustainable Development Goals and the Essential Variables for Climate, Oceans, Biodiversity, and Geodiversity.

This plan will feed-forward into the planning of the 4th Geosemantics Symposium.

Moderators
Friday July 19, 2019 11:45am - 1:15pm
Room 317

11:45am

New paradigms for alternative data packaging of geolocation information in EO satellite data
Earth observation (EO) satellite files can encode the geolocation of their
observations in a variety of ways. This often depends on the processing
level of information. Gridded rasters can be described by concise map
projection information while Level 1 and 2 data that are in native satellite
coordinates require more detail. Often these files encode the pixel level
geolocation information as multi dimension variables internal to the file.
In the past there have been example implementations of storing geolocation
in an external file (early NASA MODIS) or sub sampling geolocation
information (early NASA SeaWiFS) that did not work out very well for
various reasons. Storing the geolocation data or map projection references
in each file (granule) has many advantages the most important is playing
"nicely" with tools and services and software, and promoting
interoperability. However, the geolocation data for L1/L2 EO files are
often the storage heaviest individual component as its precision requires at
least float data types (its information cannot be elegantly "packed") so it
is worthwhile to revisit ideas and methodologies for reducing its
footprint. How best could geolocation information be shared across
different variables, different files from the same sensor, or even
different sensors on the same platform. Furthermore, in the age of cloud
and database tiled storage of satellite information how is geo-location (and
other) information best packaged and utilized to improve data access and
processing. In this session we will look at this problem and potential
solution space via a number of presentations, historical lessons learned and
dynamic discussion.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Kwo-Sen Kuo

Kwo-Sen Kuo

UMD/NASA Goddard/Bayesics LLC
Kwo-Sen Kuo is a “disruptive thinker” (commonly known as “boat-rocker” or “troublemaker”) because he likes to question the existing ways of doing things. Although he considers that to be completely rational, it is not always appreciated as so by others. His disruptiveness... Read More →


Friday July 19, 2019 11:45am - 1:15pm
Room 318

1:15pm

Lunch & Meeting End
Friday July 19, 2019 1:15pm - 2:15pm
TCC